Wednesday, March 28, 2007

an afternoon in court



Ridiculous. Probably other people leave the house and see people. I usually don't. OK, some folks asked below what a day at Cornell law playing juror was like.
First of all, it looks like a law school, the Hollywood stereotype. Big gothicish building, very old, all wood and stone inside, and the courtroom/lecture hall is very Paper Chase. (I have visited Harvard Law too, and parts of it are especially Paper Chase, as it should be, since that was the setting, but anyway...). Real judge, real defense attorney from town, REAL US Attorney (prosecutor). Fake defendent, fake jurors, dozens of scruffy looking, tired students. What it amounted to was filling out a questionair re then sitting there being asked personal questions. What was I thinking? Why did I do this? I wasn't on trial, and I tell ya, I couldn't take it. It made me sweat. I am a very very very shy and reclusive person, and tomorrow I will be interviewed with four other artists on WSKG TV, channel 12 Binghamton, what was I thinking when I agreed to that????????????????????
More later..............

15 comments:

Mrs. Pottersblog said...

One is practice for the other, eh? Experience the worst, no, expect the worst . . .

Maggie said...

Ok the jury duty sounds harrowing - especially that you know its not a true setting. Answering questions to a real judge in real court is nerve wracking enough, but you know at least you're doing your duty. But for fake court?

As for the interview, maybe you will have more fun with that since you know they probably won't be grilling you.

gr said...

Perhaps I shall be smooth and charming. Not having a TV, I have no idea what program or what anything is going on here.

Alan said...

Hey sign me up for that next year. That would be a hoot.

denis said...

if you don't have a TV, how the heck are you going to watch yourself? anyway,

good luck. i'm sure you'll be your usual charming, smart, witty self.

Gordo The Geek said...

Yay! You're doing the interview!

I hope you didn't feel compelled to tell the truth .. You were playing a part after all ...

gr said...

I did tell the truth, but I realized quickly that I don't pay attention very well anymore. I could never figure out what was being asked--I felt kinda stupid---some attorneys ask those looonnnngg complicated questions, leaving me behind at the first corner.
Alan, the judge asked if we were US citizens, so as much fun as it would be for you, they could have tossed you out right away, but you would have rec'd the beer money already, then you could sit in the gallery and make faces at us.

Mona Buonanotte said...

Is someone taping your interview? 'Cause, y'know, we'd all like to see it and chat afterwards about how funny you were and smart and handsome and other nice adjectives....

cm said...

Never mind the questions, what did they serve for lunch?

gr said...

Mona, I hope somebody tapes it, and cm, this was just the 'jury selection' phase, an afternoon's worth. There was a bottle of water, a handshake, and enough cash that I later converted to 2 small bottles of bourbon. Trials are 3 different days next month.
I am coming to see yesterday not as a mortifying and scary experience, but an exercise in getting out and seeing people, which I am obligated to do a lot more of, esp. today.

Gordo The Geek said...

Oooh! A personal growth moment! We're so proud. :-)

Greg said...

sniff sniff, they grow up so quickly don't they. One day playing with muddy clay, the next on TV and all... :)

gr said...

actually I am probably growing backwards

Alan said...

So I get thrown out - this is moot court right? I can pretend I am anything, right?

gr said...

You could pretend, but it would probably be more fun if you told the truth in steps: I am a lawyer, and later, I am a Canadian, which is when they would bounce you.