Sunday, October 14, 2007

open studio tour


(pic of Gary Rith and customer by Missus Rith)
As I say, a terrific opening day. Pretty mellow. People interested in tour artists look at the brochure and different artists portfolio and bio, therefore only those people who want to see ME and MY work show up, a self selecting group. So, they come over say nice things, see what is going on, spend a little money...more Monday.

10 comments:

Ellen said...

Looking at this picture ALMOST makes me want to go throw. I don't know what is wrong with me...just don't feel like it! In case you did not see my reply on my blog, try lanolin for the hands. It is very thick and sticky, but works really well. You can get it in a liquid, or paste. Smells like a dirty sheep, but who cares! Just don't let the pups and kitties smell your fingers. They might bite you!

ML said...

Oh, yeah! Lanolin is one of the wonders of the world as far as being kind and very healing for the skin. All those sheep know what's good, for sure. Looks like you got you an apprentice there, maybe, Gary. Nice picture!

Anonymous said...

I'm not sure what the convo is about specifically, however, i have found badger balm (for those that don't want to go the lanolin route) great. slather on.
for whatever reason (no, don't need explanations and theories), my hands dry out clay like nobody's bizness, so slopping on the badger balm before working is great for my hands and the piece.
and i don't need it when i am not working.
deborah

John Bailey said...

That is a splendid photo study.

There's a guy in Wirksworth, Derbyshire, throws ginormous heavily grogged pots, so big you'd say they were impossible until you see him -- he's just as impossibly large. Anyway, he was developing a nasty case of potter's hands and I suggested raw wool lanolin to him. He was so pleased with the result he gave me a pot... so big that people want to lodge their umbrellas in it until they see me snarl... :-)

CM said...

badger badger badger

ML said...

There's also a lovely product called "Bag Balm", which farmer's use so their cows don't, well, you know, and 'tis said the farmers have very soft hands, too! Anyway, it's good, if you can find it, but not nearly as good as the lanolin. And, John, I'm hoping you'll let us see that ginourmous pot, over there on your site, please?

gr said...

Mary Lee: Ellen and I were talking about bag balm earlier, it seems to be lanolin and something else. There was a time you had to get it at the feed store, but they sell it at my grocery store now, with the toothpaste, soap and the rest!

Ellen said...

My hubby uses lanolin as a moisturizer in the winter. He gets the thick stuff in a jar (NOW brand) and adds essential oils (lavendar is great!) to keep from smelling like a dirty sheep. That stuff works great! I am going to look for the bag balm as I have never seen it, and now I am curious.

Ellen said...

Oh, and thanks, Mr. Potsblog. The picture inspired me enough to go end my dry spell. I actually got five bowls done, revived five of my dozen mugs and got handles pulled. Off to make some more!

gr said...

right on, Ellen, right on